Comments

Close Mind vs Open Mind: Moving to Costa Rica — 16 Comments

  1. I’m not in category one, but I think I did say you might come back to the USA – only because you didn’t seem too confident about this move. I thought you were second-guessing your decision. You know what you want, so go for it.

    The people in my area who are retiring are moving close to their children so they can be active in their grandchildren’s lives (i.e. babysitting). Now that’s something I really don’t understand.

    I’ll probably stay put when I retire. I like the change of seasons, I’m less than 2 hours to several major cities, and less than 20 minutes to good restaurants and entertainment. You can still buy a very nice home in this town for less than $100,000, if you want to exchange three months of snow shoveling for palm trees.

    • re: Returning… The only way this could work is for me (and probably Nancy) to back into the workforce. It’s the only way we could afford to live in the U.S. and then I think our lifestyle would suck. Hardly a “retirement.” There are tons of homes available all across the US for $150,000 or less, agreed. This is not a good sign.

      • It’s healthy to question your move and your sanity. Shoot, it’s healthy to question your move/sanity after the fact. Trying something new and having it not work out is not the end of the world. At least you will have tried. And you get to see cool sh*t while your trying it.

  2. remember who’s making these comments………Kentucky rednecks who have never probably even been out of the state of Kentucky. People are stupid and mean when they don’t understand something……I think the majority of the comments are by old biddies who have nothing else to do but talk about you.

  3. I’ve been away for awhile. I had no idea you were doing this.
    Good for you! I’m totally impressed. I’ve wanted to move to Panama for awhile but Doug won’t entertain the idea at all.

  4. You should seriously consider one of the remarks your rich retired friends, promote and that is “do you really know where you are moving to?” It may appear to be the land of milk and honey..but, you are for sure in for a major culture shock and attitude adjustment that no one can tell you about or explain, because they are all unique to the individual. Just be real careful about the people ticos who speak English and want to be your friend…

      • Well, that is part of it for sure..but, not the important part. You are in for a wild ride and I don’t mean on the road to your new home. You picked a challenging place to live, guess you are up for it. Learn the lingo

        • “wild ride” … hard to quantify. “challenging?” you ever been to Eastern Kentucky? Yes, we will try to learn the language, but one never learns the lingo.

          • What do you mean “one never learns the lingo” that is just wrong..why not?

  5. I ponder the question of “do you really know where you are moving to?”, because in retrospect I miscalculated who I would be living among when I moved to Bowling Green. I did my research and still missed how absolutely sure people of BG are of themselves when the highlight of their lives is a trip to Orlando.

    Mark you are a pioneer. In the past, people generally relocated within the country. Now we will be relocating worldwide. Identify the trend, because the trend is your friend.
    -Mike

    • We never had a choice on where we lived. I was just another itinerant worker: I went where the job too me. MI to MI to IL to IN (No. and So.) The cultural differences are amazing in the midwest. We weren’t always thrilled, but you take what life gives you and make the best.

      I’m not a pioneer, of course, there are tons of people from the U.S. choosing to live globally. But to the Orlando-as-foreign people, we’re just nuts.

  6. I love your posts. Really make me laugh. I remember moving here and heard all the same things. Why is it such a big deal to take a chance and have some fun? Is it we just get old and can’t remember what is was like to be a kid again.

    Living in the same town your whole life is like playing a video game and staying on the same screen. Don’t you want to see what’s on the next level? The world is such a beautiful place worthy of exploring. And living abroad is about the coolest thing one can do in their lifetime.

    I love it here. I am proud I had the guts to reinvent my life. I am grateful I met so many awesome people, whether in person, or through the internet, chronicling their own unique adventures.

    Keep up the posts, they make my laugh!!!

  7. @runny bunny: “lingo” to me means slang… we are trying to learn the language. Maybe the “lingo” will come someday. We are certainly open!

    • Speaking the language includes all aspects of a language, you can learn to speak the language, along with the “lingo” just as easily as you can learn text book interpretations of words..it is all about immersion and actually speaking with the locals, listening to how they speak to each other. I suppose it is part of the process.

      However, you are correct..many people never learn the lingo…and actually miss out on real communication, as oppposed to getting by. There are many experiences that benefit from the approach you take to things, because this isn’t eastern Kentucky…no matter what issues you had with the folks there.

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